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Bun B - Trill O.G. Album Cover
Author's Rating
Vocals 8.25
Musicianship 7
Lyrics 6
Production 7
Creativity 6.5
Lasting Value 7.75
Reviewer Tilt 7.25
Final Verdict: 71%
Member Ratings
Vocals 6.75
Musicianship 7.5
Lyrics 4.88
Production 8.5
Creativity 5.88
Lasting Value 4.38
Reviewer Tilt 4.38
Average: 60%

Bun B - Trill O.G.

Reviewed by: Ian Walker (08/30/10)
Bun B - Trill O.G.
Record Label: Rap-A-Lot Records
Release Date: August 3, 2010

Trill is defined by Urban Dictionary as “an adjective used in hip-hop culture to describe someone who is considered to be well respected, coming from a combination of the words 'true' and 'real'.” One of the chief purveyors of trill in today's hip-hop scene would most definitely have to be Bun B. Comprising half of the duo Underground Kings, Bun B set out to make a name for himself as a solo act while Pimp C, the other half of UGK, faced armed assault charges in 2003. His first album Trill started out as a way to keep the Underground Kings name fresh while Pimp C served his prison sentence, but managed to garner critical praise as well as financial success. After Pimp C's death in 2007, Bun B returned to his solo work with II Trill, which continued on the successful path of his first album. Much of the acclaim came from Bun B's ability to gather talented individuals who were beginning to make names for themselves in the hip-hop scene. Because of this, Trill and II Trill were packed full of young talent as well as proven veterans. Keeping with the theme of his first two albums, Bun B released Trill O.G. in August of 2010. For his third solo offering, Bun B again gathered a group of very talented and popular names, including Drake, Young Jeezy, Twista, and Gucci Mane.

Trill O.G. opens with the track “Chuuch!!!” After a short intro from James Prince, CEO of Rap-A-Lot Records, Bun B breaks onto the track violently. The production is an odd mix of church organs and generic drum beats, but mixes with Bun B's signature raspy lyrics perfectly. A choir joins in the chorus, offering an interesting collection of church vocals and motown soul. “Chuuch!!!” serves as a great album opener, but doesn't really offer anything mind blowing or creative.

I'll just go ahead and get this out of the way right now: I'm a dork. I love cheesy humor. The more groan inducing the better. Following this way of thinking, it's easy to understand why I love T-Pain so much. He's become parody, but he knows it and makes it work. That being said, the next song on the album (“Trillionaire”) is one of my favorites. Bun B, with help from T-Pain on chorus and background vocals, makes no secret of his love for the word 'trill' and it's connotations. Like most tracks on the album the production is top notch, albeit a bit uninspired. Except for one awesomely terrible line near the beginning (“...I'm tryin' to take this to the mountaintop / Appalachian.”) Bun B's lyrics are on point, with a fantastic rhythm that trades off with T-Pain's vocals perfectly.

Bypassing a rather boring track featuring Young Jeezy (“Just Like That”), Bun B treats us to a couple of interesting guest appearances. The first comes in the track “Put It Down” featuring Drake. Simplistic organ chords match up with some basic drum beats to form a slow and heavy beat that allows Bun B and Drake to really showcase their lyrical prowess. Besides handling the last verse, Drake provides vocals to the chorus. He has a surprisingly decent singing voice, but won't manage to turn any heads in the long run. His verse contains the usual assortment of nicknames, women, and references to drugs and album sales. He pays his respects to Pimp C before the final chorus kicks in and, while thoughtful, seems oddly out of place and short.

“Right Now” contains a couple of very cool appearances, with Tupac and Pimp C both contributing verses before Bun B has his way with the track. While each verse is taken from different decades, they flow into each other exquisitely. Trey Songz lends his vocals to the chorus admirably, but he pales in comparison to the other huge talent contained within the track. None of the verses outshine the others, working in perfect unison to create a fantastic look back at decades of hip-hop history in one song.

Trill O.G. is an album without many pauses. While a couple of skits pepper the track listing, the majority are banging tracks with little to no down time. But with such a persistent beat to many of the songs, I found myself losing my focus. My attention strayed elsewhere because many of the tracks tend to flow into each other with few stand outs. Bun B's lyrics are up to par, as well as his signature aggressive rhythm, but he goes hard and stays that way throughout the entirety of Trill O.G. Like some of his earlier releases, he tends to be buried under the amount of artists he's chosen to feature.

That being said, one track after “Trillionaire” definitely stands out as one of my favorites. “I Git Down 4 Mine” is all Bun B, all the time. The entire beat is driven by a heavy bass line and Bun's heavier lyrical style. The choruses are accompanied by massive sounding horns. This is also one of the few tracks on the album that doesn't feature a vocalist or someone singing, and it definitely benefits from that. Steve Below's production on this track is unique, but at the same time draws obvious influences from other popular producers in the scene today. This track came as a surprise and definitely breaks the monotony others might feel as they make their way towards the end of the album.

Drake makes another appearance on the album's last track “It's Been a Pleasure” and helps Trill O.G. end in style. His usual lyricism is replaced by choruses of gratefulness and humility. Bun B carries the same message through his verses, chronicling his travels through the United States as a new act as well as an emerging artist. On an album full of cocky lyrics and overused themes, “It's Been a Pleasure” is a real treat. While Drake is only featured in the chorus, he steals the show. Bun B does his part too, and they combine to form an amazing final track.

Trill O.G. is a decidedly clashing album. Bun B's old school tendencies are constantly at odds with genre conventions prevalent in today's scene. Sometimes that works, and sometimes it doesn't. Listening to Bun B's latest release is like watching old horror movies. Sure, they're cheesy and cliched, but the beauty is in seeing how newer acts took pointers from those that came before. No matter what your opinion on Bun B may be, it's an undeniable fact that his work in UGK influenced a fair amount of artists in the game today. Unfortunately, his solo work tends to be weighed down by the talent he gathers around himself, and his unique lyricism doesn't always see its way out.

Track Listing1. "Chuuch!!!" (feat. J. Prince)
2. "Trillionaire" (feat. T-Pain)
3. "Just Like That" (feat. Young Jeezy)
4. "Put It Down" (feat. Drake)
5. "Right Now" (feat. Pimp C, 2Pac & Trey Songz)
6. "That's a Song (Skit)" (feat. Bluesman Ceddy St. Louis)
7. "Countin' Money" (feat. Yo Gotti & Gucci Mane)
8. "Speak Easy" (feat. Twista & Bluesman Ceddy St. Louis)
9. "Lights, Camera, Action"
10. "I Git Down 4 Mine"
11. "Snow Money"
12. "Ridin' Slow" (feat. Slim Thug)
13. "Let 'Em Know"
14. "Listen (Skit)" (feat. Bluesman Ceddy St. Louis)
15. "All a Dream" (feat. LeToya Luckett)
16. "It's Been a Pleasure" (feat. Drake)


Recommended If You LikeRick Ross, Underground Kings, Pimp C, Freeway


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Displaying posts 1 - 15 of 19.
08:49 AM on 08/31/10
#2
E. Clectic
Quit these pretentious things.
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I'm curious to why this was reviewed/posted.
It has little crossover in terms of other music on the site, it's not an up-and-comer or "underground" type artist, in terms of rap albums it's not very high profile, all which could be ignored if it was a great album. But judging by the review, this is a very average album.
09:03 AM on 08/31/10
#3
HometownHero
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I'm curious to why this was reviewed/posted.
It has little crossover in terms of other music on the site, it's not an up-and-comer or "underground" type artist, in terms of rap albums it's not very high profile, all which could be ignored if it was a great album. But judging by the review, this is a very average album.
Bun B is kinda high profile. He's been around awhile. And hip-hop gets posted on this site more often now. This site is not exclusive to one genre. But yeah the album is not that great. Has like 5 or 6 songs I would repeat. And that is mostly because of the features.
10:17 AM on 08/31/10
#4
WhoSaidThat?
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I'm curious to why this was reviewed/posted.
It has little crossover in terms of other music on the site, it's not an up-and-comer or "underground" type artist, in terms of rap albums it's not very high profile, all which could be ignored if it was a great album. But judging by the review, this is a very average album.
I'm certain Drew posted something about people who could specifically review rap albums, and I guess that led to Ian becoming staff. Anyone, feel free to correct me if no.
10:51 AM on 08/31/10
#5
cubine
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I can't get into stuff like this. P.O.S., Mos Def, guys like that, sure, but ultra generic and self-obsessed lyrics like the ones on here and countless other forgettable hip hop records keep me from getting involved in that "scene." Gangsta's over and done, people, can we please get back to poets?
11:09 AM on 08/31/10
#6
hellorocksounds
100 Miles and Runnin'
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If you're into hip hop culture, chances are you're aware of Bun-B and the things he's done to the game and what he represents.
Also, 5 Mics from the Source is a big deal for a hip hop album. Even though I personally don't think it was a 5 mic album, I can see why they would crown it that.
11:53 AM on 08/31/10
#7
PirateSkater182
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I can't get into stuff like this. P.O.S., Mos Def, guys like that, sure, but ultra generic and self-obsessed lyrics like the ones on here and countless other forgettable hip hop records keep me from getting involved in that "scene." Gangsta's over and done, people, can we please get back to poets?
You obviously have never heard Mos Def then.
12:07 PM on 08/31/10
#8
HometownHero
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I can't get into stuff like this. P.O.S., Mos Def, guys like that, sure, but ultra generic and self-obsessed lyrics like the ones on here and countless other forgettable hip hop records keep me from getting involved in that "scene." Gangsta's over and done, people, can we please get back to poets?
If you listen to more rap then you won't have this problem. Complaining about something you are not all that involved in is pretty pointless.
12:58 PM on 08/31/10
#9
mantipede
What a grand escape!
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Quote:
You obviously have never heard Mos Def then.

Wrong. Mos Def, while maybe thinking highly of himself, does not feel the need to talk about the material things he's received in his life, his cars or his chains. If anything, he's an extremely positive rapper that's all about doing stuff for yourself. Generic rap like the aforementioned is terrible and should be abolished. Every guest star on this Bun B album is guilty to some extent.

Quote:
If you listen to more rap then you won't have this problem. Complaining about something you are not all that involved in is pretty pointless.

And kidchino, saying 'listen to more rap' isn't right, either. For someone like cubine that might not listen to a lot probably only has stuff from the radio to go off of, to which he's right about: radio rap is the same general song over and over again. You should've said 'listen to different rap' or something like that.
04:01 PM on 08/31/10
DickfaceChillah
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Wrong. Mos Def, while maybe thinking highly of himself, does not feel the need to talk about the material things he's received in his life, his cars or his chains. If anything, he's an extremely positive rapper that's all about doing stuff for yourself. Generic rap like the aforementioned is terrible and should be abolished. Every guest star on this Bun B album is guilty to some extent.


And kidchino, saying 'listen to more rap' isn't right, either. For someone like cubine that might not listen to a lot probably only has stuff from the radio to go off of, to which he's right about: radio rap is the same general song over and over again. You should've said 'listen to different rap' or something like that.
Mos Def's albums are all generic in their own way. His sound and flow might not be, but his approach to hip-hop is. He's a bland, boring lyricist who tries to make up for what he lacks with constant experimentation that almost never works. His "conscious" hip-hop always comes off as blatantly preachy and annoying ignorant. I prefer him as an actor, as he is one of the few rappers who actually can act.

That being said, Bun-B is a hip-hop icon, but that doesn't make this album five mic worthy alone. Hip-hop like this is what keeps the South alive, though. And this album is a true representation of what makes Dirty South hip-hop great. It's all good if people don't dig it, but it's just silly for anyone to call for the abolishment of some of the most important hip-hop around. There'll be 10 or 20 more Mos Def's, who, in himself, is a less interesting version of Q-Tip, but there's not gonna be a whole lot more Bun-B's. And Mos Def doesn't have an entire sub-genre on his back to carry.
09:12 PM on 08/31/10
cubine
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Don't tell me I need to listen to more "rap," I'm a huge fan of hip-hop. I just don't do the whole tech n9ne vibe. I'm not some kind of elitist who won't listen to anything outside of Talib Kweli, but I just prefer more wit behind the lyrics. Stuff like Outkast has plenty of lines pertaining to gangsta tropes like "bitches n hoes" or "poppin caps" or whatever but they've always got really creative ways of twisting those cliches around (plus they clearly don't take that stuff all that seriously).

On the subject of Mos: He aims a little higher than he's capable of sometimes but for the most part I feel like he's a lot more of an artist than typical "thug" rappers. He does get a little preachy sometimes but it usually doesn't get in the way. Plus, the instrumentals on almost everything Mos has ever done are excellent. The instrumentals have a lot to do with my enjoyment of a hip-hop record. Kanye's Late Registration is a great example of a record with solid beats that make up for sometimes lackluster rhymes (although in my opinion it's his best work).

I also wouldn't say I only have radio stuff to go off of. I've been listening to a lot of Lupe and Wale lately, they hardly ever get airtime. And guys like Sage Francis and P.O.S. are some of my all time faves and I've never heard them on the radio.
09:14 PM on 08/31/10
risexfall
upstate's finest
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I ONLY LIKE CONSCIOUS RAPPERS CAUSE THEY'RE THE KIND THE MEAN BLACK KIDS ON MY BUS DON'T LISTEN TO.

Real talk though, Bun B is a southern hip-hop legend and I think this album is deserving of at least an 85 but that's just my humble opinion.
09:36 PM on 08/31/10
bnizzle
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So odd how insanely genre-based this site really is. Open your minds kids.
Bun is a great artist and this is a respectable record at least.
Pop & Hip-Hop are the top selling genres in music the past years - take note.
10:09 PM on 08/31/10
cubine
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I ONLY LIKE CONSCIOUS RAPPERS CAUSE THEY'RE THE KIND THE MEAN BLACK KIDS ON MY BUS DON'T LISTEN TO.

Real talk though, Bun B is a southern hip-hop legend and I think this album is deserving of at least an 85 but that's just my humble opinion.
That's not my viewpoint at all but whatever.
05:22 AM on 09/01/10
fly_guy
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I'm curious to why this was reviewed/posted.
It has little crossover in terms of other music on the site, it's not an up-and-comer or "underground" type artist, in terms of rap albums it's not very high profile, all which could be ignored if it was a great album. But judging by the review, this is a very average album.
you dont know what youre talking about at all
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