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10:37 AM on 03/21/11 
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sauce301
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I like how the increase in a racial divide is attributable to black people. Perhaps it requires the understanding of others as to why they shouldn't say those words. For example, I do not use the b-word, however, if women use it with one another, I understand why this is the case and do not question why I shouldn't be allowed to use the term.

i dunno, it almost seems to me that allowing one group to use a word but not others is hypocritical. i understand what you're saying, about requiring understanding as to why they shouldn't, but i don't believe that people should use the crutch of 'i'm allowed to say this and you aren't.'
10:52 AM on 03/21/11 
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Love As Arson
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i dunno, it almost seems to me that allowing one group to use a word but not others is hypocritical. i understand what you're saying, about requiring understanding as to why they shouldn't, but i don't believe that people should use the crutch of 'i'm allowed to say this and you aren't.'
Hypocrisy requires a level playing field.
10:55 AM on 03/21/11 
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EasySkankin
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I'm hispanic, and maybe i've been discriminated on job apps because of my name, but i've never faced discrimination, at least not racially anyway.

I admit that for a small period of time in high school I was a full-blown racist. I made a dumb decision and trusted some people I shouldn't have and ended up getting held up at gun point with my best friend in a very scary location. I lost my friend because of it. It was just from pure anger and frustration that I needed something or someone to blame. It wasn't so much I hated all black people, but I hated black people who fit a certain image and persona, the kind of people that held me up, and in my town there are plenty of them. In hindsight, it might sound cliche, but I do think being a racist reflects heavily on a person's own insecurities and low self-worth. It was really my own lack of good judgment and naivete that I ended up losing my best friend.
11:00 AM on 03/21/11 
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SLoT
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As a white person, I'll be the first to admit I use the word ***** frequently. I'm not racist, and I'm not trying to say anything like it's okay to use if you're not racist either. I've said it in front of black friends as well as black strangers. The race I've been confronted by the most is white people. I know there are black people who don't care whether people outside their race use it, and I know that there are those who do care. But from what I've experienced (this is underlined to emphasize that these are my personal experiences, not fact), white people care a whole lot more about the word than black people do these days.

Edit: I do in fact apologize for using the word in front of those I offend. I'm not off my rocker, I do understand it's still a word that causes much controversy.
11:01 AM on 03/21/11 
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Scrandon
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I"m hispanic, and maybe i've been discriminated on job apps because of my name, but i've never faced discrimination, at least not racially anyway.

I admit that for a small period of time in high school I was a full-blown racist. I made a dumb decision and trusted some people I shouldn't have and ended up getting held up at gun point with my best friend in a very scary location. I lost my friend because of it. It was just from pure anger and frustration that I needed something or someone to blame. It wasn't so much I hated all black people, but I hated black people who fit a certain image and persona, the kind of people that held me up, and in my town there are plenty of them. In hindsight, it might sound cliche, but I do think being a racist reflects heavily on a person's own insecurities and low self-worth. It was really my lack of good judgment and naivete that I ended up losing my best friend.
Sorry to hear that man. Good for you for getting over it.
11:01 AM on 03/21/11 
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sauce301
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Hypocrisy requires a level playing field.

and if modern society has taught us anything, it's that hard work and perseverence get you nowhere.
11:08 AM on 03/21/11 
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perceptrons
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Every time I discuss this topic, I am reminded of an article I read years ago called "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack." I'll attach the whole article, but also include the list of things in the "white knapsack."

1. I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.
2. If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area, which I can afford and in which I would want to live.
3. I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.
4. I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.
5. I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented.
6. When I am told about our national heritage or about “civilization,” I am shown that people of my color made it what it is.
7. I can be sure that my children will be given curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race.
8. If I want to, I can be pretty sure of finding a publisher for this piece on white privilege.
9. I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my cultural traditions, into a hairdresser’s shop and find someone who can cut my hair.
10. Whether I use checks, credit cards or cash, I can count on my skin color not to work against the appearance of my financial reliability.
11. I can arrange to protect my children most of the time from people who might not like them.
12. I can swear, or dress in second hand clothes, or not answer letters, without having people attribute these choices to the bad morals, the poverty, or the illiteracy of my race.
13. I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial.
14. I can do well in a challenging situation without being called a credit to my race.
15. I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.
16. I can remain oblivious of the language and customs of persons of color who constitute the world’s majority without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion.
17. I can criticize our government and talk about how much I fear its policies and behavior without being seen as a cultural outsider.
18. I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to “the person in charge,” I will be facing a person of my race.
19. If a traffic cop pulls me over or if the IRS audits my tax return, I can be sure I haven’t been singled out because of my race.
20. I can easily buy posters, post-cards, picture books, greeting cards, dolls, toys, and children’s magazines featuring people of my race.
21. I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance, or feared.
22. I can take a job with an affirmative action employer without having coworkers on the job suspect that I got it because of race.
23. I can choose public accommodation without fearing that people of my race cannot get in or will be
mistreated in the place I have chosen.
24. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help my race will not work against me.
25. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether it has racial overtones.
26. I can choose blemish cover or bandages in “flesh” color and have them more or less match my skin.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf WhitePrivilege.pdf (99.0 KB, 34 views)
11:13 AM on 03/21/11 
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JoshSalas
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^That makes me sad.
11:14 AM on 03/21/11 
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Mibabalou
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This thread has just turned into my Philosophy and Gender I took last semester, which is a good thing.
11:16 AM on 03/21/11 
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richter915
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I like how the increase in a racial divide is attributable to black people. Perhaps it requires the understanding of others as to why they shouldn't say those words. For example, I do not use the b-word, however, if women use it with one another, I understand why this is the case and do not question why I shouldn't be allowed to use the term.
Yes I would absolutely think that racism in the US can be furthered by any group, regardless of who is in power or what is deemed as the norm. This goes for any social divide. In no way am I saying that use of the word n*gga is the only, or most important, factor that furthers racism.
11:20 AM on 03/21/11 
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richter915
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Hypocrisy requires a level playing field.
This is isn't hypocrisy, it's more prejudice than anything else.

Because you are white, and all whites have racial superiority in the US....you have power...since you have power, you are not allowed to use certain words.
11:29 AM on 03/21/11 
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sauce301
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This is isn't hypocrisy, it's more prejudice than anything else.

Because you are white, and all whites have racial superiority in the US....you have power...since you have power, you are not allowed to use certain words.
i agree with the first one i may have misspoke. confused on the second, could you elaborate?
11:34 AM on 03/21/11 
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richter915
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i agree with the first one i may have misspoke. confused on the second, could you elaborate?
the OP is suggesting that white americans cannot use the word n*gga because by being white, they assume a role of racial superiority and use of the word is automatically demeaning since it comes from a white person. The prejudgment is that any white person is racially superior and inherently racist in the US, regardless of where they may stand socioeconomically or politically, etc. This is where most of the disagreements on the use of the word is coming from.

I could be wrong tho, please someone correct me if I am.
11:35 AM on 03/21/11 
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EasySkankin
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Sorry to hear that man. Good for you for getting over it.
Thanks, man.
11:42 AM on 03/21/11 
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Love As Arson
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Male - 29 Years Old
This is isn't hypocrisy, it's more prejudice than anything else.

Because you are white, and all whites have racial superiority in the US....you have power...since you have power, you are not allowed to use certain words.
White privilege is complex and the are a wide variety of axes on which power and prejudice turn. However, we should take into consideration the social situations that provide evidence. So, for example, a person with an ethnic name is less likely to be called back for a job interview than an individual with a "normal name"; the criminal justice system sentences African-Americans to harsher sentences than whites who have committed the same crimes; police brutality rates against minorities are significantly higher than against whites; minorities have less access to higher education and are more likely to go to schools without the proper resources to educate them; the official unemployment rate is ten percent, whereas for the African-American it is fifteen percent. The list goes on. White privilege isn't something personal, it is built into the structures of our society, whether whites want it or not, and it is this context that leads me to be opposed to whites using the term. Far from prejudging whites, I am indicting a system which favors a particular group and, in our subjective experiences in the world, I think one needs to be conscious of this before saying that word.
Yes I would absolutely think that racism in the US can be furthered by any group, regardless of who is in power or what is deemed as the norm. This goes for any social divide. In no way am I saying that use of the word n*gga is the only, or most important, factor that furthers racism.
The difference between those in power and the powerless is, the former has the ability to transform those ideas into concrete reality. I can agree that all racism is bad, but that isn't the same as saying that all racism is equally destructive. So, for example, I don't think the racism of the slave is the same as the racism of the landowner, because the latter has effectively institutionalized their ideas within the governmental, economic and social framework.
 



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