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01:17 PM on 01/28/14 
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thursday727
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Wick City, FL
Male - 26 Years Old
So on Friday I have an interview for a position in the company a currently work, and it would be my first ever salary pay job. I've never been that great at interviews so I really want to knock this out of the park. Any advice?

Things that might be a problem for me.
1.I don't do that great talking about myself with on the spot questions, especially ones out of left field.
2.I don't have practical workplace experience with Microsoft Office, only really toying around with it at home to try to teach myself.
3.My stats for my current position are top notch except my attendance do to transportation issues, but that would not be a problem for this position. I wasn't sure if I should nip that in the bud by being proactive about it or be reactive and only bring it up if they do.
02:27 PM on 01/28/14 
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eriatarka24
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1. I don't either. Always answer honestly and give yourself time to breathe. Don't let them see that you're nervous. I could use some advice myself in that respect.
2. Word and Powerpoint are really easy to pick up on. I've only used Excel for basic operations but that's not too hard either. You can find free online resources to learn about them. Is it a really big deal in your position?
3. Being reactive is always safer. Don't bring up anything they don't ask about. Just answer the question and don't go off on a tangent as to not catch them off guard or give them a reason to be skeptical or think twice about hiring you.
04:04 PM on 01/28/14 
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.invisible ink.
honey bunny that's the funny thing
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omnipresent
Female
So on Friday I have an interview for a position in the company a currently work, and it would be my first ever salary pay job. I've never been that great at interviews so I really want to knock this out of the park. Any advice?

Things that might be a problem for me.
1.I don't do that great talking about myself with on the spot questions, especially ones out of left field.
2.I don't have practical workplace experience with Microsoft Office, only really toying around with it at home to try to teach myself.
3.My stats for my current position are top notch except my attendance do to transportation issues, but that would not be a problem for this position. I wasn't sure if I should nip that in the bud by being proactive about it or be reactive and only bring it up if they do.

Quote:
1.I don't do that great talking about myself with on the spot questions, especially ones out of left field.

Unfortunately nowadays many companies (at least the ones I've worked for) have "behavioral based" questions which are absolutely terrible and put you on the spot as a rule. They ask the types of questions like, "Tell me about a time when you had an angry customer. What did you do to diffuse the situation?" or "Tell me about your greatest achievement in your current role." You have to be quick and think on your feet but also be honest because generally they can tell if you're lying. Also, the biggest thing is, be specific (even if you have to make up details). It's painful but the more interviews you do, the better you get at them.

Quote:
2.I don't have practical workplace experience with Microsoft Office, only really toying around with it at home to try to teach myself.

Are you at least somewhat good at what you do know? Can you type quickly? Accurately? Have you used Excel at all? If so, you're doing fine, don't act like you have no experience in it, just act confident and tell them you have used it and you're a quick learner. If you give off the impression that you suck technologically you will not make a favorable impression.

Quote:
3.My stats for my current position are top notch except my attendance do to transportation issues, but that would not be a problem for this position. I wasn't sure if I should nip that in the bud by being proactive about it or be reactive and only bring it up if they do.

Do not bring that up. Just don't. If they want to know that and they're in the same company as you currently work, they can easily find that out when they contact your current manager to do a reference check. By the way, if you find out that you're in the running for the position after the interview, that's when you give your current manager a head's up that you're being considered for another position in the company. Don't do it too early.

If they ask you what your biggest weakness is, ALWAYS turn a positive into a negative such as, i'm constantly early, i'm a perfectionist, etc. Don't ever say something that could be used against you. Easier said than done, I know.

At the end of the interview when they ask if you have any questions, *always* ask a question. There's lots of good websites about this to give you some idea of the questions to ask - here's one- http://money.usnews.com/money/career...-job-interview

Just try to be yourself and act confident. Look sharp. Bring two copies of your resume printed on nice resume paper. Buy a box of resume paper, it's worth keeping around.

Good luck! :)
06:43 PM on 01/28/14 
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Ollie McKraut
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Male - 23 Years Old
I just got my first real job after a couple weeks of steady interviews. This is useless advice, but I can tell you that interviewing gets easier with practice. My first interview after graduating was a disaster.

Truthfully I think interviews are terrible, I think confidence is wayyyy overvalued, and I think "interview skills" is an oxymoron, because putting someone under intense pressure and grilling them with unpredictable questions seems like an awful way to determine how someone is going to behave under normal conditions, but that doesn't help you either.

Try and relax. I typed up an "interview cheat sheet" with facts about the company, lists of my strengths and "weaknesses," and skeleton-answers to typical questions. I just had it right out in front of me next to my resume and a notepad--I don't think it hurt that I jotted down a few things that seemed relevant.
06:43 AM on 01/29/14 
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jpmalone4
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NJ/PA
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I have an interview tomorrow so this thread is relevant to my life. Definitely agree with the post above mine - interviews get easier the more you do them.

It's nice you work for a company that promotes from within. You have an inside track and you're probably qualified if they're interviewing you. A lot of people over think the "Am I qualified?" question. What it typically - in my experience - comes down to is whether they feel like they can work with you or see you in this position day to day. Think about it - it's far more important for them to be able to get along with you than whether or not you're excellently qualified for the job. Everyone has to go through a learning curve when they get promoted for a new job anyway.

One piece of advice - overdressing is just as bad as under dressing on an interview. I truthfully believe I got a job one time because I showed up neat casual in a flannel, jeans, and sneakers because everyone at the job dressed like that. The guy who interviewed after me showed up in a suit. He looked like an idiot. Aim to dress like the people interviewing you are dressed - but only slightly better.
08:06 AM on 01/29/14 
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thebestkylever
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chicago
Male - 29 Years Old
- If you're not researching the shit out of the company, start doing that. You don't have to know every minor detail-- but being aware of key moments in the history, major competitors, any big changes within the last year, etc... will you show that you're serious about getting this job, as opposed to just any job.

- When asked about weaknesses, I honestly think it's better to avoid phrases like ""I'm a perfectionist", "I'm TOO work oriented", "I'm just so good it intimidates other employees.." That is textbook bullshit and the person conducting the interview will know that and is sick of hearing it. Rather, turn the word weakness into the word opportunity. For instance, Instead of "I don't know shit about computers," say something like "Right now a big opportunity that I'm excited about lies in becoming more immersed in the constantly changing aspects of the modern work place. With tech breakthroughs happening faster than hardly anyone can keep track of, I feel like this position will be the perfect reason to stay ahead of the curve."

- Also, ask a ton of questions. The best question I've ever been asked during an interview is "Tell me about the best employee who has ever worked this position. What did he/she do that made him/her the best?" Then during the answer just nod and keep saying yep. Hired the fuck out of that dude.

- Be ready for the question "I've seen twelve other qualified people today for this position. Why should I hire you?" Be very specific.

Best of luck!
09:26 AM on 01/29/14 
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Tony
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Seattle
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You're in a good spot if you already work there and interviewing for this new position. A lot of companies promote from within, as the people working there will already have an idea whether or not someone is right for the job. As for your "problems"...

1. I don't think anyone is really that good at this, so you're not alone. Look up a list of typical interview questions and practice your answers so they can't catch you off-guard. Have a friend help you prep for your interview by doing a mock interview with you. And don't waste your time with bullshit questions like "If you were an animal, what would you be?" Anybody who would ask that and expect a serious answer isn't somebody you want to work for anyway. However, be prepared to answer the "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" question - they WILL ask it. Oh how I hate that fucking question.

2. Don't worry about it, everybody starts somewhere. I had little experience with Word/Excel when I started my first "real" job, but I've learned a lot in the years since. It's one of those things you'll learn on the job. As long as you can touch type, you're in good shape (and if you can't, you might consider taking a typing class at some point).

3. Don't bring it up unless they ask about it specifically. Be prepared to talk about your weaknesses, but don't include this as one of them.

Best advice is to take that energy you're spending psyching yourself out, and use it to prepare. If you're not prepared for your interview, they'll know, and they'll interpret that as apathy or lack of organization. Good luck!
09:24 AM on 01/31/14 
#8
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thursday727
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Wick City, FL
Male - 26 Years Old
Okay after action report: I think I did okay. Was I perfect? No, but I think it was the best interview i've ever done.

I started to kind of blow it when they asked me "what motivates you?" because it took me awhile to find the right words to say and they started to look at eachother but I think I rebounded nicely when I found my words. I also forgot to thank them for their time but I did say "it was nice meeting you guys". I asked two questions at the end and I feel like I should have asked more. Those are the only critiques I would give myself.

I don't think i should over analyze it too much, if I got it I got it if I didn't I didn't. At least I made the effort.
09:59 AM on 01/31/14 
#9
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thursday727
Real Rock 'n' Rolla
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Wick City, FL
Male - 26 Years Old
So I just got an email that they want a 2nd interview next week. That means I did a good job in the first interview right? Anyone know what to expect from 2nd/followup interviews?
01:54 PM on 01/31/14 
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Your Milkshake
...I drink it
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Male - 24 Years Old
2nd interview is going to be with multiple people most likely. dont get technical if they dont make you. if you dont have to bring anything technical up, theres 100% chance you wont say anything stupid lol

basically be a king at making small talk about interesting subjects (hobbies, sports, events, etc.) before the real interview starts. Once the real interview starts be able to naturally flow with the conversation and be serious about responsibilities but light hearted about any conversational tangents that may occur. and look ALL of them in the eye when you are talking. just pan around with your eyes.

basically the secret is to be extroverted and send off positive energy (body language, voice projection)
06:04 PM on 01/31/14 
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eriatarka24
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Man that's intense. What's the point of a second interview? Isn't one enough? *shudder*
06:17 PM on 01/31/14 
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.invisible ink.
honey bunny that's the funny thing
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omnipresent
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2nd interview is going to be with multiple people most likely. dont get technical if they dont make you. if you dont have to bring anything technical up, theres 100% chance you wont say anything stupid lol

basically be a king at making small talk about interesting subjects (hobbies, sports, events, etc.) before the real interview starts. Once the real interview starts be able to naturally flow with the conversation and be serious about responsibilities but light hearted about any conversational tangents that may occur. and look ALL of them in the eye when you are talking. just pan around with your eyes.

basically the secret is to be extroverted and send off positive energy (body language, voice projection)

I think it depends on the position and the company honestly. It could very well be the hiring manager's one on one interview time now that other people have whittled down the candidates a little.

It sounds like you did a good job, just try to keep cool and natural, you'll do well.
07:09 PM on 01/31/14 
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Peetie
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St Louis
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I agree with all the above -- don't forget to smile. Good luck. I think your on the track for success.
12:24 AM on 02/01/14 
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Your Milkshake
...I drink it
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Male - 24 Years Old
I think it depends on the position and the company honestly. It could very well be the hiring manager's one on one interview time now that other people have whittled down the candidates a little.

It sounds like you did a good job, just try to keep cool and natural, you'll do well.

2nd interviews are ALWAYS with multiple important people. as far as my experience goes
04:43 AM on 02/01/14 
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LickinLyrics
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Deep breathes. Don't choke. Eye contact. Don't fidget. Be truthful.



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