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Am I the only person in the world that remembers the pop-punk band Larger Than Life? I was going through some old files on my computer and came across their EP If Tomorrow Never Came -- with the "resurgence" in pop-punk I feel like I should randomly submit bands that flew way under the radar before to Tumblr blogs and see if I can't get them some buzz. These guys, Unsung Zeros, The Goodwill ... someone would bite, right? Anyway, I tossed If Tomorrow Never Came up on SoundCloud and you can stream it in the replies.
Jason Tate on 05/08/14 - 01:08 PM
Does anyone else remember the pop-punk band Knockout? I was just scrolling through my iTunes haphazardly and found this album, Searching for Solid Ground. We haven't done a weekly nostalgia post in a while -- and it reminded of of when the Chicago scene was blowing up -- bands were getting signed left and right. I decided to push play on it for fun, and it actually holds up decently for a pop-punk album. As I sat here giving the album a listen, I can't help but think that it comes right out of that era of pop-punk. Has that complete The Starting Line, Fall Out Boy, Rufio vibe going on. Looking for something fun to listen to today? Give it a shot on Rdio or Spotify. If you were a...
Jason Tate on 03/30/12 - 11:01 AM
This week marked the end of the RX Bandits' farewell run. I was more than fortunate enough to see the guys play one last time at the end of June at the very beginning of the tour, and I've been working on the way to express what the band has meant to me since picking up Progress for the first time so many years ago. As some of you may or may not know, my original username for the site was duffmanrxbandit. Head here to read my thoughts on the show, some quotes from Matt Embree about the band's music and influences and even some words from the users of AP.net. Definitely let us and the band know what you thought about the last run (for now).
Adam Pfleider on 08/12/11 - 11:44 AM
1999 looked liked one of the worst years for pop music - ever. The tweens (before they were deemed that by Disney marketers years later) ruled the radio dial, and one after another, the boy bands and jailbaited Tiger Beat pin-ups of Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera (and some ten other individually wrapped Kraft slices) took over what was coined "pop music" at the time. In 1999, two other albums should have dominated pop - one by the Olivia Tremor Control and one by The Dismemberment Plan. While the former's album is still a favorite lush, poppy acid trip I spin constantly every spring and summer, the latter was jagged, cruel and self-deprecating. It wasn't hip-hop in the vein of...
Adam Pfleider on 01/20/11 - 10:27 AM
There are few bands that are short lived that really make an impact in our personal musical journey. They're usually part of fads or trends and end up just being another disc collecting dust in our collection. Then there's a band like The Snake the Cross the Crown. A band backed by hype with an even bigger payoff. With a great EP and two solid releases under their belt, the band has disappeared since the release of 2007's Cotton Teeth. There's no evidence of hiatus or a break-up, but rather a limbo of whether the band will ever return with new music. In October of 2009, the band's label, Equal Vision Records, released a documentary, On a Carousel of Sound, We Go Round. It is not only the...
Adam Pfleider on 12/29/10 - 07:01 AM
Bodyjar never really found substantial success here in America, but the Australian punk rock band went through a whole hell of a lot to maintain their sanity and deliver six excellent full-lengths. You could say Bodyjar was Australia's version of Millencolin, and while the band hoped to revitalize themselves with a new record in 2008, it was short-lived and the group parted ways after their tour late last year. Whether this is your first official introduction to Bodyjar or you were a fan back when they were making music, we'd love to hear your thoughts and reflections. Respect your elders: check the replies.
Chris Fallon on 10/27/10 - 05:56 AM
We all have that one musician that got us through our darkest moments; the only one whose words were comforting and made us feel less alone when we needed it most. For me, that person would be Elliott Smith, as I’m sure he was for many others out there, and it makes sense that I’m struggling to find the right words to write this little piece in his memory. It’s been 7 years since he left and it never becomes easier to accept the fact that he is gone. I broke down when I came back from school 7 years ago and found out that my favourite musician was gone. How could a young and confused teenager like myself deal with the fact that the one person who seemed to truly understand was not going...
Lueda Alia on 10/21/10 - 04:31 PM
Not everyone knows Terminal began under the moniker Letter Twelve in 1998, but a sea of hearts were broken when they disbanded in 2006. The Mansfield, TX band had a propensity for writing the most powerful music - How The Lonely Keep, their only Tooth & Nail album, was one of the great emo releases of the 00's. When Travis Bryant belted "Somewhere in between here and the window pane, life is gray," we sat up straight in our seats; when he screamed "Someday you'll learn no place will make you happier!" we shivered at the meaning behind the words; when he crooned "Surely there had to be a way to smile again," we were racked with sympathy and understanding. Sure, they might have derived...
Matthew Tsai on 09/29/10 - 09:06 AM
In lieu of this week's Weekly Nostlagia, I went and saw the Pixies on their current tour, where they're performing Doolittle all the way through. Check out my review of their first night in Austin.
Adam Pfleider on 09/22/10 - 01:39 PM
Sense Field was one of the more underrated pioneers of the early emo rock movement. Despite going through major-label turbulence and never finding their true breakthrough hit (minus the blip on the radar screen that was "Save Yourself"), the band has remained a vital example of what emotionally-charged rock music has contributed to our modern scene. Whether this is your first official introduction to Sense Field or you were a fan back when they were making music, we'd love to hear your thoughts and reflections. Respect your elders: check the replies.
Chris Fallon on 09/15/10 - 04:29 AM
As J-14 Magazine prepares to pimp Runner Runner in all future issues, let us take a moment to look back on better times. Namely, Don't Look Down, a pop-punk band who hailed from New Jersey during a time when v-neck shirts, pesky haircuts and a wide array of spectacularly unusual eyeglass wear was nowhere in sight; it was Midtown, The Early November and Senses Fail. Simpler times, really. Don't Look Down got their start making their way through basement shows and cover sets in the local area. The band soon found themselves attached to a small label and released their debut album, Start the Show, in 2002. Approaching pop-punk in a comparable style to MxPx and fellow upstarts (at the time)...
Chris Fallon on 09/08/10 - 04:04 AM
With a name like Much the Same, it's no coincidence. The young melodic punk quartet were not creating anything new - just keeping a then-fossilized genre alive & well, tending to it like a beautiful war nurse to a wounded veteran. This group of Chicago kids only released three records in 8 years, but found a very loyal and steady following, even well after their demise in 2007. Their 2006 full-length Survive is on par with any solid effort from A Wilhelm Scream or Rise Against, and helped pave the way for modern up-and-comers, such as the Swellers and Transit. Their impact might seem, in retrospect, rather infantile - but it's hard to argue with the measure felt by their aftershocks....
Chris Fallon on 09/02/10 - 02:44 AM
"Please tell me whyyyyyyy..." Don't lie: you still pump your vocals up as loud as you possibly can every time "My Own Worst Enemy," the massive hit single from Lit's 1999 breakthrough A Place in the Sun, comes on during your iPod shuffle playlist. The SoCal quartet might have made a name for themselves with one of the late-90's most recognizable guitar riffs, but the band was more than its singles. Coming up with the likes of No Doubt, Sugar Ray and the Offspring, Lit were a combination of California surf, classic heavy metal and melodic '70's pop all rolled into one giant spliff of perfection. Their 2001 follow-up, Atomic, served as a lightweight segue into broader and less conventional...
Chris Fallon on 08/25/10 - 04:08 AM
Blame it on Bobby Knight. Who else was the fuel for the rage and aggression that emanated from Indianapolis quintet Split Lip, who shook the foundation of the Hoosier State with their hyper-literate, dense amalgamation of late 90s emo and hardcore. Co-songwriters David Mead and Seth Rubenstein announced their status as forces to be reckoned with with the brash and brawny Archived Music for Stubborn People, followed a few years later by For the Love of the Wounded, And then just as things were picking up, everything changed. The band released the opus Fate's Got a Driver, but altered their name to Chamberlain, and then the tectonic plates started shifting.

In 1998, the group decided...
Gregory Robson on 08/18/10 - 10:38 AM
If there was ever a band that understood the indie rock sound, it was This Day and Age. The Buffalo, New York quintet dropped three albums in its lifetime: Start Over On Monday, Always Leave the Ground and The Bell and Hammer, swooning more hearts with each release. Their music was stunningly beautiful and often boiled down to a few signature characteristics: atmosphere, intricacy and a decent dose of pulsing rock (for the perfect example, see “Always Straight Ahead”). They penned lyrics that were concerned with subjects beyond the trivialities of daily life, too, often tackling spiritual and philosophical matters. Unfortunately, they split in 2004 when Jeff Martin left the band. ...
Matthew Tsai on 08/10/10 - 10:37 PM
Some bands come about and have more influence on music than many would like to give credit to. Unfortunately, many of these artists fall off too quickly and are only honorary name drops amongst some of our favorite artists. With the anticipation of the next Jimmy Eat World album, we can't forget a little band from Colorado. Christie Front Drive were shaping the forefront of the indie/emo hybrid around the time of bands such as Texas is the Reason, Mineral and Boys Life. Only releasing a handful of 7" and splits (including one with the big time aforementioned band), the band's only proper full length is dark and brooding with plenty of heart on the sleeve vocal crooning. With the reissue...
Adam Pfleider on 08/04/10 - 10:25 AM
When it comes to bands you can't believe never hit the big time, The Stereo has to be on your short list. The promising pop-rock band only released three full-length records, but alongside Jamie Woolford's seamless vocal power and production know-how, the ever-shifting lineup made plenty of waves in a very short period of time. As one of Fueled by Ramen's first real successes, the Stereo were a diamond in a coalmine during a time when nu-metal, boy bands and snarky pop-punk ruled the scene. Woolford and bassist Chris Serafini eventually went on to form the equally-as-wonderful (and equally-as-downplayed) Let Go, who've currently seen the release of one full-length, back in 2006. Despite...
Chris Fallon on 07/29/10 - 04:38 AM
Maybe calling certain albums a "classic" overshadows certain appreciation for a record amongst a community that gauges albums so differently. For this week's nostalgia, I've taken another spin on mewithoutYou's 2004's Catch For Us the Foxes and attempt to understand its legacy amongst fans of the band. Hit the replies for some words and give us your take, the first time you heard it or what the album has meant to you as a fan or casual listener.
Adam Pfleider on 06/16/10 - 11:49 AM
As it was last year, our latest Absolute Classics article was good for stimulating discussion, and I was more than a little pleased to see one comment that Zen Arcade should have made our list. It's one of my favorite albums, and I'll certainly consider it next time around. For now, suffice it that we shine this week's AP.net Remembers spotlight on Hüsker Dü.

Easily one of the most influential band's of the '80s, Bob Mould, Grant Hart and Company produced a dizzying amount of material in their short career, a body of work that not only displayed a remarkable evolution that set the stage for much of the music that would follow but also enabled them to navigate and pioneer the type of...
Jeremy Aaron on 05/18/10 - 09:27 PM
Victory Records. The mere utterance of those two words in conjunction around AP.net-land is likely to generate responses of disdain and derision. Regardless of the label's treatment of beloved fan-favorites and its recent penchant for signing generic flavors-of-the-week, it has also undeniably pushed out some truly classic albums, not the least of which came from today's spotlight band, Grade. Their first album for the label, 1999's Under the Radar was the sound of a band coming into their own. When listening to it side-by-side with their earlier Second Nature recordings, it's easy to wonder how they even got from the proverbial Point A to Point B. Its landmark combination of melodic...
Jeremy Aaron on 05/05/10 - 07:57 AM
After you've been locked into a groove for a long time, it's never easy when things have run their course and the time comes to leave it all behind and move on. However, history offers us countless encouraging examples of bitter ends becoming sweet new beginnings, one notable example of which involves the breakup of Blake Schwarzenbach's revered punk band Jawbreaker and his re-emergence with Jets to Brazil.

With Schwarzenbach teaming up with the likes of Chris Daly (ex-Texas Is the Reason), was it even possible for his new music to do anything but rule? I'm sure there are some instances of musical collaborations that looked better on paper than they actually were, but none spring to...
Jeremy Aaron on 04/28/10 - 08:25 AM
You probably can't do much more to gain cred than sign on with Dischord Records and get Ian MacKaye to co-produce your album. With Q and Not U, though, the Fugazi frontman couldn't have picked a more perfect band to usher his venerable D.C. label into the 21st Century. With their music firmly rooted in the intelligent post-hardcore of the label's past, Q and Not U also embodied their forebears' forward-thinking and boundary-pushing ethos, tossing spazzy, danceable rhythms together with abrasive, clangy riffs into their visceral, high-energy mix. Their career boasts an intriguing evolution, which came about initially out of necessity. After saying goodbye to bassist Matt Borlik following...
Jeremy Aaron on 04/21/10 - 08:09 AM
Where's Weekly Nostalgia? Well, it hasn't exactly gone anywhere. We just beefed it up and gave it this new name. We'll still be paying tribute to those bands that made up the soundtrack for your high school summers, but we didn't want to limit ourselves to the recently departed. Rest assured that each week, we'll be shining the spotlight on a band from yesteryear that's shaped the music of today. Few bands exemplify humble beginnings spawning something hugely influential quite like Cap'n Jazz. I mean here's a band that contained both Tim and Mike Kinsella (who pretty much are Midwestern indie-rock) and Davey Von Bohlen (from a little band we've featured in this spot called The Promise...
Jeremy Aaron on 04/14/10 - 02:40 AM
With their recent 20th anniversary reunion and upcoming performance at next week's Coachella festival, what better time to direct the WN spotlight on Pavement, the '90s most brilliantly demented pop songsmiths? The problem with focusing on such an iconic band is, of course, saying something about them that already hasn't been said better somewhere else.

Pavement aren't my favorite band, but from a purely analytical standpoint, they probably should be. Maybe in time, they will be. See, Stephen Malkmus's deadpanned suburban ennui is perfect for those of us for whom the "real life" most people find ultimate meaning in simply doesn't hold much appeal. As I sit here jockeying my cubicle...
Jeremy Aaron on 04/07/10 - 07:44 AM
Aesthetically, no one wants to ever be told what to expect. If a sound is so far off course from the norm, sometimes we don't even retain what just hit us right away. Like any sort of genre-defying move, the ideas eventually get regurgitated and overly run into the ground, or the ideas stem from earlier ground that never surfaced and took notice on a major level first. Refused has written their history with their 1998 album, The Shape of Punk to Come: A Chimercial Bombination in 12 Bursts. It was an album inspired by an inner circle of friends and musicians in Sweden who were constantly trying to out do each other creatively. Only two years before, the band released Songs to Fan the...
Adam Pfleider on 03/31/10 - 09:14 AM
These bands we look back on with fond memories, it seems most of them lasted only a few short years and left behind scant discographies. Perhaps having an all-too-short career adds to the mystique and makes a band an obvious subject for a feature like this. However, for proof that a band can hang around for a decade, produce five excellent albums and still leave us wanting more, enter Hot Rod Circuit. Their early records were filled with angsty guitar rock, perfect for bespectacled teens into Weezer, Piebald and The Get Up Kids. The pop element was definitely present, but didn't manifest fully until the super-catchy (and irresistible) Sorry About Tomorrow. By their final album The...
Jeremy Aaron on 03/23/10 - 09:41 PM
With just a single full-length, an EP, and a couple of singles in their catalog, Texas Is the Reason were living proof that longevity isn't required for a band to make an enduring impression. Letting go of the tough-guy posturing of their previous hardcore bands and turning toward decidedly more melodic and emotional waters, the band formed in 1994 and lasted just three short years, leaving behind precious little to remember them by, perhaps making each selection seem all the more special because of it. Not that their body of work isn't impressive in its own right-- the lone full-length Do You Know Who You Are? is a post-hardcore classic, with huge arena-filling guitars and enough heart...
Jeremy Aaron on 03/17/10 - 11:33 AM
A punk band bringing back the Spirit of '77 in the early years of the 21st Century seems like one of the unlikeliest acts to incite a major label bidding war, but after the success of their relentless debut full-length Flash Flash Flash, that's exactly what happened with The Explosion. Eventually landing at Virgin Records, the Boston quintet didn't water down their sound much with their jump to the majors, keeping their old-school punk revivalism largely intact and releasing Black Tape, another fiery and catchy set of fist-pumping anthems. After finishing up recording their third LP, they were dropped from Virgin, and ultimately decided to call it quits early in 2007, leaving behind only...
Jeremy Aaron on 03/10/10 - 07:18 AM
Situated just North of the Rio Grande, dusty El Paso, Texas, seems like the kind of place likely to give rise to Western and Latin-influenced sounds, but in the early 1990's a different kind of storm was brewing. With their first live performance in October 1994, the post-hardcore juggernaut known as At the Drive-In was unleashed on the world, and on the strength of two early EPs and enthusiastic word-of-mouth, the quintet drew the attention of Flipside Records, who released their 1996 debut full-length Acrobatic Tenement, a work of volatile and shapeshifting intensity, a harbinger of things to come. They followed it up with the equally forceful In/Casino/Out in 1998 and the...
Jeremy Aaron on 03/03/10 - 08:55 AM
Even if you prefer Matthew Good’s recent solo efforts, I think it’s hard to deny that some very excellent records came out of his time in the Matthew Good Band. The Canadian alternative rock act formed in the early 90’s and released a record called Last of the Ghetto Astronauts before hitting it big with Underdogs in 1997. That album’s opener “Deep Six” has a catchy chorus that still pulls me in even to this day and “Apparitions” is one hauntingly beautiful track. My personal favourite though is Beautiful Midnight. It also happens to be their most commercially successful release, since the singles gained heavy radio rotation and earned the band two Junos. Even today you'll hear those...
Deborah Remus on 02/17/10 - 09:52 AM
Imagine if the Ramones had at least one female vocalist backing them up while Ben Weasel wrote their songs. Now you know what Teen Idols sound like, a rotating four-piece based out of Nashville (now Chicago) that always played second fiddle to their skate-punk peers. Perhaps it was due to their powerpop-infused harmonies or lack of political awareness, yet no matter how you spell it, their four full-length albums were something to celebrate. While the band plans to return later this year with new material, it's been nearly eight years since the band recorded anything at all. Their jubilant three-chord sound that mixed traditional punk rock with powerpop, rock n' roll and surf has been...
Chris Fallon on 02/10/10 - 06:08 AM
Coming out of Berkeley, California in the late '80's, Samiam helped spark a craze that fused alternative college rock with punk ethics, fastening their legitimacy onto the '90's indie music scene with several well-received records (Clumsy, You Are Freaking Me Out). While they never reached the mainstream level of success they hoped to achieve after releasing two major-label efforts, the band had a devoted following until quietly ending things in 2000. The group did reform in 2006, however, for one more album before in-fighting and creative differences pushed them back into futility. A new album was rumored to be in production last spring, although there has been no firm evidence to...
Chris Fallon on 02/03/10 - 01:39 AM
We've already featured Braid in the Weekly Nostalgia spotlight, and it's about time we showcase Bob Nanna's post-Braid band. Hey Mercedes would blend Braid's emo-rock passion with a touch of powerpop melody and accessibility. Their short run, spanning roughly five years, spawned three EP's and two well-loved full-lengths. 2001's Everynight Fire Works found the band navigating the delicate balance of earnestness and catharsis, while 2003's Loses Control went in a slightly more immediate direction, with what seemed like an added focus on catchy supercharged riffs, though its songs remained equally powerful. While the band may no longer be recording, fans can take solace in knowing that...
Jeremy Aaron on 01/06/10 - 12:19 PM
It's been quite a decade for us. We've seen music pass through digital, manipulative frequencies and watched others strip their sounds bare. In a decade where there was not only an industry shift, but a creative shift in rediscovery, I'm going to throwback to a band that still stirs controversy of positive praise and negative guff to this day - Neutral Milk Hotel. As a Louisiana native, it's crazy to think that such a project started in the BF-town of Ruston, home to Louisiana Tech. Like many great projects, this one started in the bedrooms, combining four track recordings matched to adolescent instrumental and compositional discovery. Only leaving behind two full lengths, 1996's On...
Adam Pfleider on 12/30/09 - 07:30 AM
Beulah were just a pop band. They made simple little songs about simpler things and it all went down smooth at a local sandwich shop or by a nondescript river. And if that's the outer surface for your band, congratulations. Most bands would kill to be perceived as likable and benign and so forth. Did I say kill for? I meant commit suicide because of. And that's doubly (maybe even triply) true for Beulah. The changes from album to album, like When Your Heartstrings Break's spring lightness to Yoko's dark brooding with a candy center, are almost unthinkably different. Miles Kurosky and his Beulah brethren have seen all the music world has to offer, and most of it looks like Styx - think...
Blake Solomon on 12/23/09 - 08:23 AM
They started out as an indie rock band in the 90’s, but that’s not what Treble Charger is widely known for. They made their mark on the mainstream a little later by playing super catchy tunes with a pop-punk edge to them. If you were living in Canada near the start of this decade, it’s very unlikely you don’t know who they are. Their singles were all over the radio, their music videos were on constant rotation at MuchMusic and they were even nominated at the Junos. For me, this band was certainly one of my gateways into pop-punk. I loved “American Psycho” when it came out and this band was also one of my first shows. I saw them play in 2003 with Sum 41, who was actually managed by Treble...
Deborah Remus on 12/16/09 - 11:37 AM
I've had quite an obsession this past year with discovering early post-hardcore bands. I'm not speaking of the obvious influences of Jawbox, Sunny Day Real Estate and Jawbreaker - ones I am already familiar with - no, I'm speaking more along the lines of a band like Still Life. Formed in Los Angeles, California at the tip end of the 80's, the band started to take shape around 1991 and released a series of 7" records. In 1996, the band released From Angry Heads With Skyward Eyes, one of the first true emocore/screamo records in the first wave of bands in the 90's. The song lengths on the album stick out, as there is not one track below the five minute mark, as each one slowly builds and...
Adam Pfleider on 12/09/09 - 11:30 AM
We all have those days. When the world is simply wearing us thin and we just want to go buck wild on it. While the law and common decency won't allow for such action, The Blood Brothers have managed to create a sound to release said frustration through. Formed in 1997 in Seattle, Washington, duel vocalist Jordan Billie and Johnny Whitney were low end-high end audible sirens backed by the the ferocious guitar work of Cody Votolato and the rhythmic groove of Morgan Henderson and Mark Gajadhar. After releasing two intense albums, the band released their breakthrough record, 2003's Burn Piano Island, Burn. A post-hardcore triumph in balancing choruses and building monuments that would come...
Adam Pfleider on 11/18/09 - 10:52 AM
What's the point of slick production if there is no heart? Mineral's only two releases don't sound like they were made to the best audio quality, but the passion of both their records boils over the surface of vocalist/guitarist Chris Simpson's audible desperation. Drummer Gabriel Wiley, guitarist Scott McCarver and bassist Jeremy Gomez complete the early influence that was the Texas four piece of an early heart on the sleeve of many. 1997's debut, The Power of Failing, is an early indie/emo staple with the likes of Diary and Dear You. The entire album, lyrically and musically fragile, soft verses to heavy choruses and guitar picking builds and intros, sounds closest to early Sunny Day...
Adam Pfleider on 11/11/09 - 07:34 AM
Teetering the lines of what was punk and what was post, The Jesus Lizard came on the scene in 1989, releasing Pure, their debut EP through Touch and Go Records. In 1991, the band released Goat, which is claimed by many critics to be their seminal release. Daunting guitar riffs mixed with a bold rhythm section, the vocals of David Yow overlapped the music with a frightful sermon that gave the band a cold, yet driving sound. Their next two albums, 1992's Liar and 1994's Down would be their last records for Touch and Go before signing to Capitol Records to release their final two. Though it is argued that 1996's Shot and 1998's Blue depart a bit from the band's formidable sound, there's no...
Adam Pfleider on 11/04/09 - 01:10 PM
It's cold, windy, pouring rain and once this storm front passes through, it will drop to winter coats and chilly nights. I've decided to leave my bed only to take out my copy of American Football's self-titled and let its tracks flood my small apartment while I work a bit. In Urbana, Illinois, guitarist/bassist/vocalist Mike Kinsella, guitarist Steve Holmes and drummer Steve Lamos painted a picture that was worthy of gracing the roof of a chapel, landscaped in horns, easy drumming and guitar lines that carried the listener through. The band only released one full-length and one EP, and Mike Kinsella has since moved on to his solo project as Owen, but checking out Owen's latest discs, At...
Adam Pfleider on 10/21/09 - 10:20 AM
I remember getting a demo tape from a friend in high school. I used to cover "Lost It" and "He Said" in a ska cover band I was in my senior year of high school. I can't pop in Heads Are Gonna Roll without thinking of a time when life was innocent and fun, before it was violently shoved into the responsibilities of college and beyond. The Hippos not only hold a place in my music catalog, they are forever cemented in a great time in my life. Hailing from Los Angeles, the six piece (with only a minor line-up change for their final self-titled), combined synth, horns and pop into an all out blast of upbeat fun. If you're looking for some good tunes for good times, I highly recommend...
Adam Pfleider on 10/14/09 - 12:30 PM
Supposedly Norma Jean ripped them off. Fans can't stop yelling their name out at Minus the Bear, Narrows, and (case in point, last night) These Arms Are Snakes shows. Everyone and your mom wants to see at least one more show from them. Botch are held on the high end by metal heads, post-hardcore nuts and mathematicians/digital fiends. Born in the depths of Tacoma, Washington (not Seattle) bassist Brian Cook, drummer Tim Latona, vocalist Dave Verellen, and guitarist Dave Knudson brought a ferocious sound that was both pummeling to the chest, and creative to that ol' medulla oblongata. After countless 7" records and demos, the band released The Unifying Themes of Sex, Death and Religion in...
Adam Pfleider on 10/07/09 - 07:44 AM
There's something haunting about Engine Down's music that crawls under the skin, and only heightens the senses enough to be carried along and never blown away from each intricate detail. In 1996, four men emerged from Richmond, Virginia with a vibrant sound: vocalist/guitarist Keeley Davis, drummer Cornbread Compton, bassist Jason Wood and guitarist Jonathan Fuller. After their first two albums, Engine Down crafted Demure, a 45-minute sonic ride of rhythmic bites backed by superb guitar aftertaste. The band disbanded after their self-titled record, but managed to have their final tour documented in a DVD which surfaced last year entitled From Beginning to End. While the members have...
Adam Pfleider on 09/30/09 - 09:46 AM
Before the “emo” tag became a part of popular culture, The Get Up Kids were making the Midwest proud with their unique rock ‘n’ roll sound. Whether they got crowds jumping along to the fast-paced confessional “Coming Clean” or kept them entranced with the piano driven “I’ll Catch You”, The Get Up Kids proved themselves as a band comfortable in creating pop hits, unabashed ballads, or anything inbetween. Though there is not enough space here to laud every individual effort that made the band special, a big part of their success was due to Matt Pryor’s unmistakable voice, which somehow blended the ruggedness of rock with the irresistible lure of pop. To this day Something to Write Home...
Adrian Villagomez on 09/24/09 - 12:11 AM
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